[Daily article] March 20: Barry Voight

Barry Voight (born 1937) is an American geologist, volcanologist,
author, and engineer. He was a professor of geology at Pennsylvania
State University from 1964 until his retirement in 2005. He still
conducts research on rock mechanics, plate tectonics, disaster
prevention, and geotechnical engineering. In April 1980, Voight’s
publications on landslides, avalanches and other mass movements
convinced Rocky Crandell of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to ask him
to look at a growing bulge on the Mount St. Helens volcano in the state
of Washington. Voight predicted the collapse of the mountain’s north
flank as well as a powerful eruption. After his predictions were
realized in May 1980, he was hired by the USGS to investigate the debris
avalanche that initiated the eruption. His work at St. Helens brought
him international recognition, and he continued researching and guiding
monitoring efforts at several active volcanoes, including Nevado del
Ruiz in Colombia, Mount Merapi in Indonesia, and Soufrière Hills, a
volcano on the Caribbean island of Montserrat.

Read more:

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Today’s selected anniversaries:

235:

Maximinus Thrax succeeded to the throne of the Roman Empire, a
so-called barracks emperor who gained power by virtue of his command of
the army.

1852:

Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe was first published,
profoundly affecting attitudes toward African Americans and slavery in
the United States.

1922:

The United States Navy commissioned its first aircraft carrier,
USS Langley.

1987:

The antiretroviral drug zidovudine (AZT) became the first
antiviral drug approved for use against HIV and AIDS.

1993:

The Troubles: The second of two bomb attacks by the Provisional
IRA in Warrington, England, killed two children.

_____________________________
Wiktionary’s word of the day:

carious:
Having caries (bone or tooth decay); decayed, rotten.

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Wikiquote quote of the day:

  I’ve always assumed that every time a child is born, the Divine
reenters the world. Okay? That’s the meaning of the Christmas story. And
every time that child’s purity is corrupted by society, that’s the
meaning of the Crucifixion story. Your man Jesus stands for that child,
that pure spirit, and as its surrogate, he’s being born and put to death
again and again, over and over, every time we inhale and exhale, not
just at the vernal equinox and on the twenty-fifth of December.  
–Tom Robbins

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